GOD'S TITHING REQUIREMENT FOR THE CHURCH TODAY
CHRIST'S MINISTRY: WHY IT WAS NOT FUNDED BY TITHES
One paper asks, "How did our Savior fund his ministry?"  We are led
right away into an area that is gray and really irrelevant to the
question of tithing when it is fully understood.  We must remember
that during the life of Christ the law of tithing, which gave the tithes
to the Levites, was still binding.  The Christ could not require anyone
to tithe to Him as that would have been breaking the law.  The law
specified that the tithes were to go to the Levites; so until The
Messiah ratified the New Covenant with His blood, the law was not
changed.  Hebrews 7 is written to explain, not the doing away of
tithing, but the change in the administration of the law of tithing.  Paul
could have used any law to express the point he was making in
Hebrews 7.  Most of Paul’s writings talk about the laws of
justification and how they have been replaced by The Messiah’s
sacrifice.  Circumcision had already been covered.  Here the writer of
Hebrews uses the law of tithing to illustrate his point.

God provided for the ministry of The Christ in a way so that the law
of tithing could continue under the administration of the Levites, until
the New Covenant began.  It is thought that Hebrews was written
sometime near 68AD.  The temple was destroyed two years later in
70AD.  Paul, under inspiration was preparing the people for the
transition from the worship of God at the temple in Jerusalem to the
worship of God in spirit and truth at the temple in heaven.  But,
wealthy friends provided for The Messiah and His ministry.  The
Christ did miracles to draw the crowds and preach to them the
gospel.  Then he provided for their food needs by other miracles such
as the loaves and fishes.  We do not see a ministry today, which can
produce miracles to draw the crowds, or feed them once they arrive.  
It is obvious that The Messiah's ministry was a special ministry
provided for in a special way during the transition period of the two
covenants.  To compare His ministry with ours today is illogical.
THE TRANSITION FROM THE TEMPLE MINISTRY TO THE
MINISTRY OF THE NEW COVENANT
By the time of the writing of the book of Hebrews, it is obvious that
further instructions were needed for the financing of the church.  The
time was right.  The transition from the temple ministry to the new
covenant ministry was about complete.  The people would need to
know what to do when the temple was destroyed.

During the transition period, giving was emphasized, as it was not
breaking the temple law to give over and above one's tithes.  Once
The Messiah was resurrected from the dead, it would have been
lawful for believers to use the tithes to further the gospel, but it would
not have been profitable for bringing many of the Jews into the
church.  It should not stretch our imagination that the early believers
tithed to the temple from a lack of understanding about the new
covenant as well as to keep from being a stumbling block to their
friends and families.

Now while those in the ministry who served their fellow believers had
a right to eat and drink at the expense out of the church treasury, we
do not find that the ministers of the new covenant were to receive the
full tithes of the people for their living expense.  There is a good
reason for this.  The tithes under the old covenant were taken from
the 12 tribes and given to the one tribe of Levi.  10% from the 12
tribes (Joseph received 2 portions in the tribes) would be just about
right for the one tribe of Levi to live on and do the work of the
temple.  Today a minister would become wealthy from the tithes of a
large congregation.  God never intended wealth to be gotten from
serving the membership of the church.  Wealth tends to corrupt, and
God tempts no man!

1Ti 3:8  Likewise must the deacons be grave, not double tongued, not given to
much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre (money);  

So if someone is serving the membership, he has a right to expect pay
especially if he is doing so full time.  Notice 1Cor.9:9 below, was in the
early ministry of Paul when the tithes was still going to the temple and
the Levites in practice, if not still required.  Later, in Hebrews 7, Paul
shows that the priesthood has been changed and of necessity a change
has been made in the law of tithing also.  Paul had to be wise in not
requiring tithes of the people to the church rather than to the temple,
in the early part of his ministry, as at this time he would have gotten a
riot instead, especially among the Jews.  So, Paul uses the example of
the law of the ox in the Old Testament to get across the point that as
their helper in that which was spiritual, he was entitled to part of their
physical substance.  But another and more important reason he did not
ask tithes of the people was because as a minister of God he was not
due the tithes, but only a wage for his service paid from the revenue of
the tithes of the priesthood or the church.

1Cor.9.9 For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth
of the ox that treadeth out the corn.  Doth God take care for oxen?
10 Or saith he it altogether for our sakes?  For our sakes, no doubt, this is
written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in
hope should be partaker of his hope.
11 If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap
your carnal things?  

But, the tithes must go to take care of many things in the church.  If
the tithes are all paid to one man then a burden is placed on the people
to make up what is needed for the other expenses.  The idea of
sending tithes to a headquarters is a carryover of the idea of the
temple.

While voluntary giving is an important part of a believer’s obligation
to the church, tithing is a more structured obligation, which is very
much required.

2Cor 9:7, So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of
necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.

If a man feels that he should be rewarded for his service to the church,
he has the wrong approach and should look for a job elsewhere.  One
who is teaching others the way should remember the following
admonition:

1Ti 6:10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted
after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many
sorrows.

So, it should not be concluded, even though the New Testament
Church was required to tithe that this money went directly to those
who were preaching the gospel.  It would only be natural that part of
the money did go to the preachers of the gospel as Paul explained.  
Even though Paul was a tent maker by trade, he showed how it was
right for himself to live from the money of the people.


By the time of the writing of the book of Hebrews, it is obvious that
further instructions were needed for the financing of the church.  The
time was right.  The transition from the temple ministry to the new
covenant ministry was about complete.  The people would need to
know what to do when the temple was destroyed.

During the transition period, giving was emphasized, as it was not
breaking the temple law to give over and above one's tithes.  Once
The Messiah was resurrected from the dead, it would have been
lawful for believers to use the tithes to further the gospel, but it would
not have been profitable for bringing many of the Jews into the
church.  It should not stretch our imagination that the early believers
tithed to the temple from a lack of understanding about the new
covenant as well as to keep from being a stumbling block to their
friends and families.

Now while those in the ministry who served their fellow believers had
a right to eat and drink at the expense out of the church treasury, we
do not find that the ministers of the new covenant were to receive the
full tithes of the people for their living expense.  There is a good
reason for this.  The tithes under the old covenant were taken from
the 12 tribes and given to the one tribe of Levi.  10% from the 12
tribes (Joseph received 2 portions in the tribes) would be just about
right for the one tribe of Levi to live on and do the work of the
temple.  Today a minister would become wealthy from the tithes of a
large congregation.  God never intended wealth to be gotten from
serving the membership of the church.  Wealth tends to corrupt, and
God tempts no man!

1Ti 3:8  Likewise must the deacons be grave, not double tongued, not given to
much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre (money);  

So if someone is serving the membership, he has a right to expect pay
especially if he is doing so full time.  Notice 1Cor.9:9 below, was in the
early ministry of Paul when the tithes was still going to the temple and
the Levites in practice, if not still required.  Later, in Hebrews 7, Paul
shows that the priesthood has been changed and of necessity a change
has been made in the law of tithing also.  Paul had to be wise in not
requiring tithes of the people to the church rather than to the temple,
in the early part of his ministry, as at this time he would have gotten a
riot instead, especially among the Jews.  So, Paul uses the example of
the law of the ox in the Old Testament to get across the point that as
their helper in that which was spiritual, he was entitled to part of their
physical substance.  But another and more important reason he did not
ask tithes of the people was because as a minister of God he was not
due the tithes, but only a wage for his service paid from the revenue of
the tithes of the priesthood or the church.

1Cor.9.9 For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth
of the ox that treadeth out the corn.  Doth God take care for oxen?
10 Or saith he it altogether for our sakes?  For our sakes, no doubt, this is
written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in
hope should be partaker of his hope.
11 If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap
your carnal things?  

But, the tithes must go to take care of many things in the church.  If
the tithes are all paid to one man then a burden is placed on the people
to make up what is needed for the other expenses.  The idea of
sending tithes to a headquarters is a carryover of the idea of the
temple.

While voluntary giving is an important part of a believer’s obligation
to the church, tithing is a more structured obligation, which is very
much required.

2Cor 9:7, So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of
necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.

If a man feels that he should be rewarded for his service to the church,
he has the wrong approach and should look for a job elsewhere.  One
who is teaching others the way should remember the following
admonition:

1Ti 6:10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted
after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many
sorrows.

So, it should not be concluded, even though the New Testament
Church was required to tithe that this money went directly to those
who were preaching the gospel.  It would only be natural that part of
the money did go to the preachers of the gospel as Paul explained.  
Even though Paul was a tent maker by trade, he showed how it was
right for himself to live from the money of the people.

At this point, let's look at the example of Jacob in the Old Testament.  
Some have drawn the conclusion that Jacob made a bargain with God.  
That Jacob bribed God by offering to pay Him tithes of all <if> He
would bless him.  But in the story of Jacob and how it relates to tithes
we should consider the whole context in order to draw our
conclusions.  Some stumble because of the word <if> saying that Jacob
was bargaining with God.  That is absolutely in error.

Genesis 28:13 And, behold, the LORD stood above it, and said, I am the LORD
God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac: the land whereon thou liest,
to thee will I give it, and to thy seed;
14 And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad
to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south: and in thee and
in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed.
15 And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou
goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I
have done that which I have spoken to thee of.
16  And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the LORD is in this
place; and I knew it not.
17 And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place! this is none other
but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
18 And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put
for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it.
19 And he called the name of that place Bethel: but the name of that city was
called Luz at the first.
20 And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in
this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on,
21 So that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be
my God:
22 And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all
that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.

In verse 20, the word <if> is not a word of <condition> but an adverb
of time.  It could better be translated, <when>.  In other words, God
had, personally, made Jacob the promises of the birthright, which
Isaac had spoken over him just prior to his leaving home.  Jacob was
saying in return to God, When you bring this about, I in turn will
reciprocate with tithes of all.  Jacob was not making a bargain with
God.  Jacob was stating his intentions to worship God (knowing what
God expected of him) with the tithes of those things that God said He
would give Jacob.  Tithing had become a tradition of worship from
Abraham, Isaac, and now Jacob.  At this time Jacob was not a leader
of anyone.  He had no children, no wives, nobody but himself.

If the law of tithing had not been given through Moses we would not
know tithing as anything but voluntary.  However, through the law of
tithing administered in the Levitical Priesthood, we are shown that
God gave <His> tithes to the Levites for the duration of their
priesthood.  Hebrews 7 shows that the law of tithing has been again
over-turned to the priesthood of today, of which we are all a part.  
By the time of the writing of the book of Hebrews, it is obvious that
further instructions were needed for the financing of the church.  The
time was right.  The transition from the temple ministry to the new
covenant ministry was about complete.  The people would need to
know what to do when the temple was destroyed.

During the transition period, giving was emphasized, as it was not
breaking the temple law to give over and above one's tithes.  Once
The Messiah was resurrected from the dead, it would have been
lawful for believers to use the tithes to further the gospel, but it would
not have been profitable for bringing many of the Jews into the
church.  It should not stretch our imagination that the early believers
tithed to the temple from a lack of understanding about the new
covenant as well as to keep from being a stumbling block to their
friends and families.

Now while those in the ministry who served their fellow believers had
a right to eat and drink at the expense out of the church treasury, we
do not find that the ministers of the new covenant were to receive the
full tithes of the people for their living expense.  There is a good
reason for this.  The tithes under the old covenant were taken from
the 12 tribes and given to the one tribe of Levi.  10% from the 12
tribes (Joseph received 2 portions in the tribes) would be just about
right for the one tribe of Levi to live on and do the work of the
temple.  Today a minister would become wealthy from the tithes of a
large congregation.  God never intended wealth to be gotten from
serving the membership of the church.  Wealth tends to corrupt, and
God tempts no man!

1Ti 3:8  Likewise must the deacons be grave, not double tongued, not given to
much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre (money);  

So if someone is serving the membership, he has a right to expect pay
especially if he is doing so full time.  Notice 1Cor.9:9 below, was in the
early ministry of Paul when the tithes was still going to the temple and
the Levites in practice, if not still required.  Later, in Hebrews 7, Paul
shows that the priesthood has been changed and of necessity a change
has been made in the law of tithing also.  Paul had to be wise in not
requiring tithes of the people to the church rather than to the temple,
in the early part of his ministry, as at this time he would have gotten a
riot instead, especially among the Jews.  So, Paul uses the example of
the law of the ox in the Old Testament to get across the point that as
their helper in that which was spiritual, he was entitled to part of their
physical substance.  But another and more important reason he did not
ask tithes of the people was because as a minister of God he was not
due the tithes, but only a wage for his service paid from the revenue of
the tithes of the priesthood or the church.

1Cor.9.9 For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth
of the ox that treadeth out the corn.  Doth God take care for oxen?
10 Or saith he it altogether for our sakes?  For our sakes, no doubt, this is
written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in
hope should be partaker of his hope.
11 If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap
your carnal things?  

But, the tithes must go to take care of many things in the church.  If
the tithes are all paid to one man then a burden is placed on the people
to make up what is needed for the other expenses.  The idea of
sending tithes to a headquarters is a carryover of the idea of the
temple.

While voluntary giving is an important part of a believer’s obligation
to the church, tithing is a more structured obligation, which is very
much required.

2Cor 9:7, So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of
necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.

If a man feels that he should be rewarded for his service to the church,
he has the wrong approach and should look for a job elsewhere.  One
who is teaching others the way should remember the following
admonition:

1Ti 6:10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted
after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many
sorrows.

So, it should not be concluded, even though the New Testament
Church was required to tithe that this money went directly to those
who were preaching the gospel.  It would only be natural that part of
the money did go to the preachers of the gospel as Paul explained.  
Even though Paul was a tent maker by trade, he showed how it was
right for himself to live from the money of the people.

At this point, let's look at the example of Jacob in the Old Testament.  
Some have drawn the conclusion that Jacob made a bargain with God.  
That Jacob bribed God by offering to pay Him tithes of all <if> He
would bless him.  But in the story of Jacob and how it relates to tithes
we should consider the whole context in order to draw our
conclusions.  Some stumble because of the word <if> saying that Jacob
was bargaining with God.  That is absolutely in error.

Genesis 28:13 And, behold, the LORD stood above it, and said, I am the LORD
God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac: the land whereon thou liest,
to thee will I give it, and to thy seed;
14 And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad
to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south: and in thee and
in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed.
15 And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou
goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I
have done that which I have spoken to thee of.
16  And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the LORD is in this
place; and I knew it not.
17 And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place! this is none other
but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
18 And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put
for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it.
19 And he called the name of that place Bethel: but the name of that city was
called Luz at the first.
20 And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in
this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on,
21 So that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be
my God:
22 And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all
that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.

In verse 20, the word <if> is not a word of <condition> but an adverb
of time.  It could better be translated, <when>.  In other words, God
had, personally, made Jacob the promises of the birthright, which
Isaac had spoken over him just prior to his leaving home.  Jacob was
saying in return to God, When you bring this about, I in turn will
reciprocate with tithes of all.  Jacob was not making a bargain with
God.  Jacob was stating his intentions to worship God (knowing what
God expected of him) with the tithes of those things that God said He
would give Jacob.  Tithing had become a tradition of worship from
Abraham, Isaac, and now Jacob.  At this time Jacob was not a leader
of anyone.  He had no children, no wives, nobody but himself.

If the law of tithing had not been given through Moses we would not
know tithing as anything but voluntary.  However, through the law of
tithing administered in the Levitical Priesthood, we are shown that
God gave <His> tithes to the Levites for the duration of their
priesthood.  Hebrews 7 shows that the law of tithing has been again
over-turned to the priesthood of today, of which we are all a part.  
By the time of the writing of the book of Hebrews, it is obvious that
further instructions were needed for the financing of the church.  The
time was right.  The transition from the temple ministry to the new
covenant ministry was about complete.  The people would need to
know what to do when the temple was destroyed.

During the transition period, giving was emphasized, as it was not
breaking the temple law to give over and above one's tithes.  Once
The Messiah was resurrected from the dead, it would have been
lawful for believers to use the tithes to further the gospel, but it would
not have been profitable for bringing many of the Jews into the
church.  It should not stretch our imagination that the early believers
tithed to the temple from a lack of understanding about the new
covenant as well as to keep from being a stumbling block to their
friends and families.

Now while those in the ministry who served their fellow believers had
a right to eat and drink at the expense out of the church treasury, we
do not find that the ministers of the new covenant were to receive the
full tithes of the people for their living expense.  There is a good
reason for this.  The tithes under the old covenant were taken from
the 12 tribes and given to the one tribe of Levi.  10% from the 12
tribes (Joseph received 2 portions in the tribes) would be just about
right for the one tribe of Levi to live on and do the work of the
temple.  Today a minister would become wealthy from the tithes of a
large congregation.  God never intended wealth to be gotten from
serving the membership of the church.  Wealth tends to corrupt, and
God tempts no man!

1Ti 3:8  Likewise must the deacons be grave, not double tongued, not given to
much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre (money);  

So if someone is serving the membership, he has a right to expect pay
especially if he is doing so full time.  Notice 1Cor.9:9 below, was in the
early ministry of Paul when the tithes was still going to the temple and
the Levites in practice, if not still required.  Later, in Hebrews 7, Paul
shows that the priesthood has been changed and of necessity a change
has been made in the law of tithing also.  Paul had to be wise in not
requiring tithes of the people to the church rather than to the temple,
in the early part of his ministry, as at this time he would have gotten a
riot instead, especially among the Jews.  So, Paul uses the example of
the law of the ox in the Old Testament to get across the point that as
their helper in that which was spiritual, he was entitled to part of their
physical substance.  But another and more important reason he did not
ask tithes of the people was because as a minister of God he was not
due the tithes, but only a wage for his service paid from the revenue of
the tithes of the priesthood or the church.

1Cor.9.9 For it is written in the law of Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the mouth
of the ox that treadeth out the corn.  Doth God take care for oxen?
10 Or saith he it altogether for our sakes?  For our sakes, no doubt, this is
written: that he that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in
hope should be partaker of his hope.
11 If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap
your carnal things?  

But, the tithes must go to take care of many things in the church.  If
the tithes are all paid to one man then a burden is placed on the people
to make up what is needed for the other expenses.  The idea of
sending tithes to a headquarters is a carryover of the idea of the
temple.

While voluntary giving is an important part of a believer’s obligation
to the church, tithing is a more structured obligation, which is very
much required.

2Cor 9:7, So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of
necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.

If a man feels that he should be rewarded for his service to the church,
he has the wrong approach and should look for a job elsewhere.  One
who is teaching others the way should remember the following
admonition:

1Ti 6:10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted
after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many
sorrows.

So, it should not be concluded, even though the New Testament
Church was required to tithe that this money went directly to those
who were preaching the gospel.  It would only be natural that part of
the money did go to the preachers of the gospel as Paul explained.  
Even though Paul was a tent maker by trade, he showed how it was
right for himself to live from the money of the people.

At this point, let's look at the example of Jacob in the Old Testament.  
Some have drawn the conclusion that Jacob made a bargain with God.  
That Jacob bribed God by offering to pay Him tithes of all <if> He
would bless him.  But in the story of Jacob and how it relates to tithes
we should consider the whole context in order to draw our
conclusions.  Some stumble because of the word <if> saying that Jacob
was bargaining with God.  That is absolutely in error.

Genesis 28:13 And, behold, the LORD stood above it, and said, I am the LORD
God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac: the land whereon thou liest,
to thee will I give it, and to thy seed;
14 And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad
to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south: and in thee and
in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed.
15 And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou
goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I
have done that which I have spoken to thee of.
16  And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the LORD is in this
place; and I knew it not.
17 And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place! this is none other
but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
18 And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put
for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it.
19 And he called the name of that place Bethel: but the name of that city was
called Luz at the first.
20 And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in
this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on,
21 So that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be
my God:
22 And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all
that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.

In verse 20, the word <if> is not a word of <condition> but an adverb
of time.  It could better be translated, <when>.  In other words, God
had, personally, made Jacob the promises of the birthright, which
Isaac had spoken over him just prior to his leaving home.  Jacob was
saying in return to God, When you bring this about, I in turn will
reciprocate with tithes of all.  Jacob was not making a bargain with
God.  Jacob was stating his intentions to worship God (knowing what
God expected of him) with the tithes of those things that God said He
would give Jacob.  Tithing had become a tradition of worship from
Abraham, Isaac, and now Jacob.  At this time Jacob was not a leader
of anyone.  He had no children, no wives, nobody but himself.

If the law of tithing had not been given through Moses we would not
know tithing as anything but voluntary.  However, through the law of
tithing administered in the Levitical Priesthood, we are shown that
God gave <His> tithes to the Levites for the duration of their
priesthood.  Hebrews 7 shows that the law of tithing has been again
over-turned to the priesthood of today, of which we are all a part.  
GOD GAVE HIS TITHES TO THE LEVITES FOR A
PERIOD OF TIME
Notice in the verse below that first of all, the tithes were a heave
offering to God.  Symbolically the tithes went to God first, showing
that God had the right to require these tithes and then God, in turn,
gave the tithes to the Levites for their inheritance because He did
not give them an inheritance in the land, for their inheritance was
God.  This verse would indicate that God was giving over to the
Levites something that in the past, and even now, belongs to Him.

Nu 18:24 But the tithes of the children of Israel, which they offer as
an heave offering unto the LORD, I have given to the Levites to
inherit: therefore I have said unto them, Among the children of
Israel they shall have no inheritance.  

The important question to be asked is, Where in the Bible do we find
the law of tithing struck from the books?  It is obvious to all that the
law of tithing was established, at least, with the old covenant.
A CONTRAST OF JACOB AND ESAU
The book of Malachi, which means <my messenger> says, "Jacob I
have loved; But Esau I have hated."  What God did for Jacob
(Israel) was to pour out the blessings of the earth upon him.  We in
the United States are a great part of that blessing today.  But what
happened to Esau?  "God laid waste his mountains and his heritage
for the jackals of the wilderness."  Notice the contrast of these two
sons of Isaac.  Remember that Jacob said he would pay tithes of all
that God gave him.  This by extension is bound upon the children of
Israel (Jacob) even to this day.  On the other hand, Esau never
promised God anything and what did he get?  He got very little in
comparison - even to this day.  Notice that the blessings are still
being given to Jacob through his descendants.  Therefore, we are
obligated to tithe on those blessings, for in doing so we are keeping
the promise of our father Jacob.

But God shows in chapter 3 of Malachi that He is going to send a
messenger in the last days who will prepare the way before Him.  
Verses 2-3 show that it is the second coming of The Christ that is
being referred to.  God pleads with his people to return to him.  He
says that from the days of your fathers you have gone away from
My <ordinances> and have not kept them.  Return to Me, and I will
return to you, says the Lord of hosts.  But you said, In what way
shall we return?  

The word ordinances above is translated 87 times as <statute> and 9
times as <ordinances>.  These are the two primary translations.  
The word statute, which is by far the most used of these two words
in the KJV translation, means <law>.  So God is saying that they
have gone away from My laws and have not kept them.  And the
example given is the law of tithing.

Here we are in the last days at the very time when this prophecy is
going to be fulfilled and the message from God is, "Return to Me,
and I will return to you."

At this same time we have people in the ostensible Church of God
who are taking it upon themselves to loosen that which has not been
loosened.  Why, right here in the end time when this prophecy is
being fulfilled?

And the people said, "In what way shall we return?"

God's answer:  "Will a man rob God?  Yet you have robbed Me!  
But you say, In what way have we robbed You?  In tithes and
offerings.  You are cursed with a curse, For you have robbed Me,
Even this whole nation."

Then God exhorts the people to bring the tithes in and put Him to
the test to see if He will not open the windows of heaven and pour
out a blessing of great magnitude.
Continue ...
Tithing for Today
There have been many different approaches to the subject of tithing
and giving in the Church of God in this end time.  There have been
many different conclusions.  Some have arrived at the conclusion that
we should not tithe at all, but just give generously.

In a study of this subject, as any other in connection with doctrines of
the Bible, we must remember that we only have the right to pass on
the understanding of the Bible.  We don't have the right to bind or
loosen what has not already been bound or loosened by God.

Matthew 16.19, The Amplified Bible:  
"I will give you the keys of the
kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind --that is, declare to be improper and
unlawful--on earth must be already bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on
earth--declare lawful--must be what is already loosed in heaven."

As the Bible nowhere shows that the law of tithing has been annulled,
we must seek to understand the law of tithing and its proper
application for today.

Those who seek to invalidate the law of tithing, or any other doctrine
of the Bible, usually begin their study in the New Testament.  When
we understand that the New Testament is an extension of the Old
Testament, we will begin our study in the Old Testament, beginning
with the Torah, or the first five books of the Bible, the writings of
Moses and the Law of God.

Joh 5:46  For had ye believed Moses, ye would have believed me: for he wrote
of me.
47  But if ye believe not his writings, how shall ye believe my words?  

Isa 8:20  To the law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this
word, it is because there is no light in them.