Contents
THE DAY: HEBREW RECKONING
THE DAY: HEBREW RECKONING
THE DAY: HEBREW RECKONING
Diagram #1
“The Evening and the Morning Were the First Day”
THE DAY: EARLY 14TH PASSOVER
RECKONING
evening (#6153) (whole evening)
morn (#1242)

1st even (#6153)
(ben ha arbayim)
(evening of noon)

2nd evening (#6153)
(evening of sunset)

morning (#1242)
(noon)
(noon)
(daybreak)
(the whole day accounted for)
(the whole day accounted for)
(the whole day accounted for)
(the whole day accounted for)
(the whole day accounted for)
DIAGRAM #2
“The Evening and the Morning Were the First Day?”
evening
morning

?
1st eve
ben ha
arbayim
2nd evening
(darkness)
morning
(#1242)
(Noon)
(Sunset)
3 Stars
Daybreak
(This
portion of
the day
not
accounted
for)
(only part of the day accounted for)
Why do we start our day at midnight?  Did Satan instigate this so it would be as far in the
opposite direction as possible from the time when God originally started the day, at
noon?  Just as God later started the year for the Church in the Spring, so the day for the
Church was to start with the evening of sunset as the Hebrew, based on the context,
should be understood, in other words, the evening that begins with sunset.  

There is no reason for confusion.  The context will usually tell which evening we are to
comprehend.  In Genesis 1:5, evening is from noon until daybreak – the whole evening:
because we must add together the entire morning and the entire evening to make the
whole day.  

Genesis 1:5 And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night.  And the evening and the
morning were the first day.

In Exodus 16:13, “in the evening” is sometime between noon and sunset, during the first evening:
because the bible established "between the evenings" for the coming of the quail in verse 12.  

Exodus 16:12 I have heard the murmurings of the children of Israel: speak unto them, saying, At even
(between the evenings) ye shall eat flesh, and in the morning ye shall be filled with bread; and ye
shall know that I am the LORD your God.
13  And it came to pass, that at even
(in the evening – a reference to: “between the evenings” of the
previous verse)
the quails came up, and covered the camp: and in the morning the dew lay round
about the host.

In Leviticus 23.32, “at even” begins with sunset (the evening of sunset) because the bible
nowhere establishes “between the evenings” for the beginning of a day of worship.  
Furthermore, the context specifies a day of the month.  The bible does not use “Between
the evenings” to begin the holy convocations or the 24-hour day.  The bible uses the term
“between the evenings” for an interval of time in which an event takes place.  The bible
does not use “Between the two evenings” to begin time.  The four events mentioned
previously were to take place during an interval of time – “between the evenings”.  One
priest might “light” the tabernacle lamp a few minutes earlier or later than another
priest.  The only specification was that the priests “light” the lamp “between the two
evenings”.  

In Leviticus 23:32, the bible specifies what makes up an entire day of worship.  This verse
also shows how the bible expresses two evenings 24 hours apart – the evening of one day
and the evening of the next day.  Notice that the bible did not use the plural duals-suffix
tool to express these two evenings of different days.  Every calendar day began at a
specific point of time – sunset.

Leviticus 23:32 It [shall be] unto you a Sabbath of rest, and ye shall afflict your souls: in the ninth
[day] of the month at even, from even unto even, shall ye celebrate your Sabbath.

Even though the Hebrew may use the same inseparable preposition for the word evening,
the English is sometimes translated as “at” and sometimes it is translated as “in”.  This
common preposition may be translated in several ways and one makes the determination
based on the context of the Hebrew and its meaning in English.  Different translations of
the bible will use different English words for the various Hebrew propositions.  The
translators do not always make the correct determination for the Hebrew terms.  
Sometimes their misunderstanding of the scriptures gets in the way and sometimes the
vagueness of the Hebrew is at fault.  Many Hebrew words such as “evening” and “day”
require the reader to determine the meaning based on the context.

The most common evening mentioned in the bible is the evening of sunset and we should
accept it as the proper definition unless the evening of noon or the whole evening is
obvious.  The first evening is the evening of noon; the second evening is the evening of
sunset; "between the two evenings" is the interval between the evening of noon and the
evening of sunset.  The bible usually refers to evening by its beginning – which can be
confusing unless one is aware of this perspective – and has caused some to think that
evening is sunset.  However, it also makes clearer that the term "between the two
evenings" means literally,
"between the beginnings of the two evenings".  Nevertheless,
this is always in reference to the time between the first evening and the second evening
that follows it.  There is no instance where “between the evenings” refers to the second
evening of one day and the first evening of the next day.

Deuteronomy 16.6 tells us when "between the two evenings" is, "...you shall sacrifice the
Passover at even (that is, "between the two evenings" as established in other places in
the books of Moses),
at the going down of the sun (afternoon)...” In addition, we have the
record of the Septuagint (LXX) (285-247 BC) – about 50-100 years before the Sadducees
or Pharisees came on the scene, long before the deceptive Jews of Christ’s day; and
almost 1000 years before the Masoretic text from which our current Old Testament is
derived.  In Exodus 12.6, "...and all the multitude of the congregation of the children of
Israel shall kill it
toward evening."  Exodus 16.12, "...speak to them, saying, towards
evening ye shall eat flesh..."  Numbers 28.8, "And the second lamb thou shalt offer
toward evening;..."  Moreover, even Christ our Passover was Himself sacrificed for us
toward the evening, on the fourteenth day of the month of Abib.

KJV
Deuteronomy 16:6 But at the place which the LORD thy God shall choose to place his name in, there
thou shalt sacrifice the Passover at even, at the going down of the sun, at the season that thou camest
forth out of Egypt.

LXX
Exodus 12:6 And it shall be kept by you till the fourteenth of this month, and all the multitude of the
congregation of the children of Israel shall kill it toward evening.

LXX
Exodus 16:12 I have heard the murmuring of the children of Israel: speak to them, saying, Towards
evening ye shall eat flesh, and in the morning ye shall be satisfied with bread; and ye shall know that
I am the Lord your God.

LXX
Numbers 28:8 And the second lamb thou shalt offer toward evening; thou shalt offer it according to
its meat-offering and according to its drink-offering for a smell of sweet savour to the Lord.
(sunset)
(Noon)