What You Should Know
About the Passover!
                                        Leviticus 23:11, 15-16

Although these three verses of Scriptures are about the wave sheaf
and counting Pentecost, that is not our reason for discussing them
here.  They are right in the middle of this discussion of the word
"day" #4283 the morrow after.  

Lev 23:11 (KJV), "And he shall wave the sheaf before the Lord, to be
accepted for you: on the morrow after (#4283) the Sabbath the priest
shall wave it."  

The translators found it imperative to use the implied word after in
this case because otherwise their translation would have distorted the
sense of the original.  On the morrow after the Sabbath means they
offered the wave sheaf during the daylight portion of the day
following the Sabbath of the previous day.  

Lev 23:15 (KJV), “And you shall count unto you from the morrow
after (#4283) the Sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of
the wave offering; seven Sabbaths shall be complete:”  

What we want to understand here is that 1), The Hebrew and the
KJV translators used the interpretive word, from because of the
counting mode; 2), The Israelites counted from the DAYLIGHT
PORTION OF THE DAY (the morning in this case) when they waved
the omer: there is an important reason for this, as we will see later –
although it has nothing to do with Passover!

Lev 23:16 (KJV), “Even unto (all the way through) the morrow after
(#4283) the seventh Sabbath shall ye number fifty days; and ye shall
offer a new meat (meal) offering unto the Lord.”

Notice the interpretive word <unto> used because of the counting
mode.  However, the Hebrew word used here means <ever> - it has
the meaning of perpetuity.  In other words, the count was to continue
all the way through the morrow after the seventh Sabbath.  One may
consider this verse in two ways.  Read our Pentecost article for
another perspective.  

Now notice where we wind up – on the MORNING of the fiftieth day
when the priest offered the new meat (meal) offering of Pentecost soon
after the morning sacrifice!  The priests did not count from sunset of
day one to sunset of day fifty.  This is just a side light, but in our
study, it became obvious that here is the answer to those who would
keep Pentecost on the 51st day.  They count from sunset to sunset.  
However, the priests counted Pentecost from MORNING TO
MORNING!  Of course, the Holyday of the fiftieth day would be from
sunset to sunset; but the count itself was from morning to morning –
not from sunset to sunset!

To conclude, the priest waved the sheaf on the DAYLIGHT portion of
the day; the count began on the DAYLIGHT portion of the day; and,
the count ended on the DAYLIGHT portion of the day when the
priest offered the meal offering for Pentecost.  Of course, the subject
of this book is not Pentecost.  We are validating the statement that the
morrow after (#4283) is not night, or the 24-hour day; rather that it is
the DAYLIGHT portion of the day; moreover, it is the morning of the
next day in most cases.

                                            NUMBERS 33:3

Numbers 33:3: "And they departed from Rameses in the first month,
on the fifteenth day of the first month; on the morrow after (#4283)
the Passover the Children of Israel went out with an high hand in the
sight of all the Egyptians."  

As we now know that the Israelites left on the daylight portion of the
fifteenth day of the first month, we can understand that the Passover
was slain on the afternoon of the 14th and eaten on the night of the
15th.  For if it had been slain and eaten on the early part of the 14th,
on the morrow after the Passover would then have been the daylight
portion of the 14th day.  That will not work because Numbers 33:3
says they left on the daylight portion of the 15th day.  In other words,
if the Israelites observed Passover on the early part of the 14th, Moses
would have written Numbers 33:3 differently.  For an early 14th
Passover, Moses would have rendered Numbers 33:3 as follows:

"And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the
FOURTEENTH DAY of the first month; on the morrow after the
Passover the Children of Israel went out with an high hand in the
sight of all the Egyptians."  

Also, in order for this new scripture to be true, they would have had
to leave on the daylight portion of the 14th day, and not at the
beginning of the 15th (during the night) as some believe.  One cannot
construe the morrow to be during the night.  One must enhance the
word morrow in order to include the night portion of the 24-hour day
such as: Tomorrow night.  As the bible does not specify that it was
“tomorrow night” we cannot stretch the word “morrow” in Numbers
33:3 to include the night of the 15th Nisan.

Therefore, the Israelites left – began their journey – out of Egypt on
the daylight portion of the 15th day of Abib/Nisan.  If we persist in an
early 14th Passover, this poses some problems.  The Israelites would
have had to stay overnight after an early 14th eating of the Passover,
until the daylight of the 15th, about 30 hours after the midnight
command for them to get out.  It seems that the women would have
had ample time to leaven their bread after all; furthermore, we must
consider the several references to their leaving hastily (Exodus 11:1;
Exodus 12:11, 33, 39, Deuteronomy 16:3).  With Pharaoh’s record of
retracting his promise of their departure, would the Israelites have
dallied around for 30 hours after Passover?

JFB Commentary on Deuteronomy 16:1:
"brought thee forth out of Egypt by night.  This statement is
apparently at variance with the prohibition, Exodus 12:22, as well as
with the recorded fact that their departure took place in the morning
(Exodus 13:3; Numbers. 33:3)."  

Exodus 12:22 And ye shall take a bunch of hyssop, and dip [it] in the
blood that [is] in the bason, and strike the lintel and the two side posts
with the blood that [is] in the bason; and none of you shall go out at
the door of his house until the morning.

What JFB is saying concerning Deuteronomy 16:1 is that according
to Exodus 12:22 the Israelites could not leave their houses until the
morning – the morrow after the Passover.  Further, that when we
couple this with the statement in Numbers 33:3 that the Israelites
departed from their houses in Rameses on the morrow after Passover
and that day was the 15th Nisan, the facts create a variance in the
scriptures.  As we will see, there is no discrepancy when we
understand that the statement “brought you forth out of Egypt by
night” in Deuteronomy 16:1 is either a figure of speech or in
reference to the night they crossed the Red Sea.

One can perceive with some certainty that the word day in Exodus 13:
3 – in the light of the context – was the morning of their departure.  
However, the word "day", or "on the morrow" of Numbers 33:3
illustrates beyond any doubt that the Israelites left on the
DAYLIGHT portion of the fifteenth day of Abib/Nisan.

Exodus 13:3 And Moses said unto the people, Remember this day, in
which ye came out from Egypt, out of the house of bondage; for by
strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this [place]: there
shall no leavened bread be eaten.

The word <morrow> <#4283> as used in Numbers 33:3 <proves>
beyond a shadow of a doubt when "between the two evenings" is and
when the Israelites kept the Passover for the first time in Egypt – even
without the understanding of “between the two evenings.”

Numbers 33:3 And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on
the fifteenth day of the first month; on the morrow (#04283) after the
Passover the children of Israel went out with an high hand in the sight
of all the Egyptians.

The word means, <the morrow>, or, <the day after> in the sense of
the daylight part of the day.  We include it a second time for your
convenience.

Online Bible:
04283 mochorath {mokh-or-awth'} or mochoratham (1 Sam 30:17)
{mokh-or-aw-thawm'}

from the same as 04279; TWOT - 1185b; n f

AV - morrow 29, next day 2, next 1; 32

1) the morrow, the day after

Here is the definition of morrow in English:

The American Heritage Dictionary – Third Edition:
morrow (noun) 1. The following day; 2. The time immediately
subsequent to a particular event. 3. Archaic. The morning. From Old
English morgen, morning.

The English word, from which this word <morrow> came, anciently
meant <morning>.  When the KJV translators used the word, it
probably meant <morning>.  In any event, even today, it means, the
following day – in the sense of the daylight part of the day.  Our word
<tomorrow> also comes from this same origin.  Old English was <to
morgenne> meaning “in the morning.”  When we say, we will go to
town tomorrow, we do not mean tomorrow night unless we attach the
word <night> to the phrase.  Rather we usually mean in the morning.  
If we mean tomorrow afternoon, we will use that distinction.  
Therefore, we are generous when we say that <morrow> can mean
the daylight part of the day from sunup to sundown.  Unless the
Hebrew gives indication that the word includes the afternoon of the
day, it is more likely that it means <morning>.

There is no time when the use of this word in the Hebrew Language
means anything beyond the daylight portion of the day.  Moreover,
many times it specifically means the morning part of the day –
morning meaning from daybreak to noon.  One could go so far as to
say that unless the context goes beyond morning, this word – when
referring to the next day – always means morning.

Numbers 33:3 informs us that the Israelites departed from Rameses
on the <morrow> after the Passover.  If the Israelites had observed
the Passover at the beginning of the 14th of Nisan/Abib the <morrow>
after the Passover would have been the daylight portion of the 14th
day, which followed that event.

We find the solution in Numbers 33:3 which tells us they departed
from Rameses on the <15th day> of the first month – Nisan/Abib.  We
know that the Passover was slain on the 14th day of Abib.  Therefore,
the morrow after the Passover had to be the <daylight> part of the
15th day.  The Israelites could not have departed on the 15th, if
Passover had been at the beginning of the 14th, and still leave on the
<morrow> after the Passover.  The 15th would be two morrows after
an early 14th Passover!

This also proves that "between the two evenings" was the
<afternoon> of the 14th.  This is all that will fit and keep Numbers 33:
3 in the picture.

The Passover as used in Numbers 33:3 is an event.  Passover was over
by daylight of the 15th Nisan.  Moreover, the morrow after Passover
began at daybreak of the 15th.  The “morrow after the Passover” is
not a continuation of the Passover.  The event of Passover was history
at daybreak.

One can consider the Passover as an event, a lamb, a festival, a
sacrifice, an ordinance, or a feast; but we have found no place, where
the bible expresses the Passover as a <day>.  It is "kept" on a portion
of a day – between the evenings – but it is not the day itself.  The
Passover is an event that took place at the end of the 14th and during
the beginning – the night portion – of the 15th day of the month, down
to the time of the Messiah.  Now the entire event takes place during
the beginning of the 15th, because Christ has fulfilled the sacrificial
part of the 14th day.  However, the Israelites did not observe Passover
from evening to evening; if that were the case, then the 14th is a
holyday (Read our article, Is it Possible for the 14th to be a
Holyday).  There is a holy convocation on the morrow after the
Passover, so the 15th day is holy from sunset to sunset.  However, the
Passover Observance was always only an evening service.  Search the
words “Passover day” in your bible software for the KJV and you will
find, “No such phrase”.  The KJV of the Bible never refers to the
Passover as a <day>!  Passover was an event, not a day.  

                                    An Early Observation


In Deuteronomy 16:1, we could have a figure of speech in the phrase,
"the Lord your God BROUGHT you out of Egypt by night".  We will
give you a literal answer to this verse as well as a figurative answer.  
This expression does not indicate that the children of Israel left Egypt
by night after Moses had organized them into ranks, as Joshua blew
his shofar during the night that began the 15th.  That would be a
literal and specific statement.  In fact, it does not even say that the
children of Israel left Egypt at all on Passover night.  In Numbers 33:
3, it unmistakably says that the Israelites left Egypt sometime between
the crack of dawn and sunset, during the daylight portion of the
fifteenth day of the first month – and it was probably during the early
morning hours of the 15th when they began their journey out of
Egypt.  This Scripture in Deuteronomy 16:1 is not about what the
children of Israel did, it is about what God did!  The Israelites could
not go until Pharaoh gave the word.

Exodus 10:25, "But Moses said, 'You must also give us sacrifices and
burnt offerings, that we may sacrifice to the Lord our God.'"  Verse
27, "But the Lord hardened Pharaoh's heart, and he (Pharaoh) would
not let them go."  

Moses required sacrifices of Pharaoh so he refused to let them go!  
Deuteronomy 16:1 in this phrase, “brought thee forth out of Egypt by
night” is a figure of speech, if we demand that it refers to the
beginning of the 15th or Passover night.  For, if we take this phrase
literally, it means that God raptured them out of Egypt, much as He
did later to Elijah the prophet.  In other words, a literal
understanding of this phrase requires us to believe that God picked
them up and set them outside the nation of Egypt during the night of
the 15th of Nisan.  The reason we must come to this conclusion – for a
literal interpretation – is that the Israelites did not leave Egypt
during either the night of the 14th or the 15th!  They were still in
Egypt for several days.  We know the facts will not allow a literal
interpretation: so we must conclude that this phrase is a figure of
speech – that is if we demand that it refer to the night following sunset
that begins the 15th, as required by early 14th Passover advocates.  

The word brought is Strong's #3318 and according to Strong has a
great variety of applications both <literal> and <figurative>, direct
and proximate.  From the facts, we know that God effected their
deliverance at night when Pharaoh gave the word, "Rise and go out
from among my people" (Exodus 12:29-32).  Their freedom legally
began at that moment.  They were officially free to leave Egypt when
daylight came, as God required them to stay in their houses until the
morning.  Undoubtedly they were frantically completing their last
minute packing, as they waited for daylight.  Therefore, one could say
that God brought them out of Egypt even before they left their houses
– figuratively.  Pharaoh was broken and the Israelites were free at
midnight of the 15th of Nisan/Abib.  However, Pharaoh took one last
stand, and there we will see the literal interpretation of, “God
brought you out of Egypt by night”!

Exodus 12:22 And ye shall take a bunch of hyssop, and dip [it] in the
blood that [is] in the bason, and strike the lintel and the two side posts
with the blood that [is] in the bason; and none of you shall go out at
the door of his house until the morning.

Those who claim that the original Passover was at the beginning of
the 14th, use the "night theory of escape" and the "requirement" of
fantastic logistics to cloud the simple narrative of the exodus.  
Deuteronomy 16:1 is a scripture some use to "prove" that Israel came
out of Egypt by night at the beginning of the 15th.  The verse is not
about what Israel did, but about what God did.  The focus is on God,
not on the people.  The verse says nothing about the night of the 14th,
or the 15th.  All we can know from this verse is that the night was in
the month of Abib!  

Deuteronomy 16:1  Observe the month of Abib, and keep the Passover
unto the LORD thy God: for in the month of Abib the LORD thy God
brought (03318) [8689] thee forth out of Egypt by night.

The word for brought is Strong's #3318 in the Hebrew.  This verb's
parsing number is #8689.  As shown below, Hiphil is the parsing stem
for the word as used here in Deuteronomy 16:1.  One meaning of the
Hiphil stem is, <to cause to go out> another meaning is “to deliver”.  
God delivered the Israelites when He broke the back of the nation of
Egypt – its firstborn.

Online Bible:
03318 yatsa' {yaw-tsaw'}

a primitive root; TWOT - 893; v

AV - ....out 518, ....forth 411, bring 24, come 24, proceed 16,
go 13, depart 10, misc 53; 1069

1) to go out, come out, exit, go forth
1a) (Qal)
1a1) to go or come out or forth, depart
1a2) to go forth (to a place)
1a3) to go forward, proceed to (to or toward something)
1a4) to come or go forth (with purpose or for result)
1a5) to come out of

1b) (Hiphil)
1b1) to cause to go or come out, bring out, lead out
1b2) to bring out of
1b3) to lead out
1b4) to deliver

1c) (Hophal) to be brought out or forth


08689 Stem  - Hiphil
           Mood  - Perfect  
           Count – 2675

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