What You Should Know About
the Passover !
Numbers 33.3: "And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first
month; on the morrow after (#4283) the Passover the Children of Israel went out with an high hand
in the sight of all the Egyptians."  

As we now know that the Israelites left on the daylight portion of the fifteenth day of the
first month, we can now also know that the Passover was slain on the afternoon of the
14th and eaten on the night of the 15th.  For if it had been slain and eaten on the early
part of the 14th, on the morrow after the Passover would then have been the daylight
portion of the 14th day.  That will not work because Numbers 33:3 says they left on the
daylight portion of the 15th day.  Please notice, that if the Israelites observed Passover
on the early part of the 14th, Moses would have written Numbers 33:3 differently.  For an
early 14th Passover, Moses would have rendered Numbers 33:3 as follows:

"And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the FOURTEENTH DAY of the first month;
on the morrow after the Passover the Children of Israel went out with an high hand in the sight of all
the Egyptians."  

Also, in order for this new scripture to be true, they would have had to leave on the
daylight portion of the 14th day, and not at the beginning of the 15th (during the night) as
some believe.  One cannot construe the morrow to be during the night.

The above has established that the Israelites left on the daylight portion of the 15th day
of Abib.  If we persist in an early 14th Passover, this poses some problems.  The Israelites
would have had to stay overnight after an early 14th eating of the Passover, until the
daylight of the 15th, about 30 hours after the midnight command for them to get out.  It
seems that the women would have had ample time to leaven their bread after all;
furthermore, we must consider the several references to their leaving hastily (Exodus 11:
1; Exodus 12:11, 33, 39, Deuteronomy 16:3).  With Pharaoh’s record of recanting their
departure, would the Israelites have dallied around for 30 hours after Passover?

JFB Commentary on Deuteronomy 16.1: "brought thee forth out of Egypt by night.  This statement is
apparently at variance with the prohibition, Exodus 12:22, as well as with the recorded
fact that their
departure took place in the
morning (Exodus 13.3; Numbers. 33.3)."  

We can understand the word day in Exodus 13.3 in the light of the context to be the
morning of their departure.  And the word "day", or
"on the morrow" of Numbers 33.3
shows beyond any doubt that the Israelites left on the DAYLIGHT portion of the
fifteenth day of Abib.

Exodus 13:3 And Moses said unto the people, Remember this day, in which ye came out from Egypt,
out of the house of bondage; for by strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this [place]:
there shall no leavened bread be eaten.

The word <morrow> <#4283> as used in Numbers 33.3 <proves> beyond a shadow of a
doubt when "between the two evenings" is and when Passover was kept the first time in
Egypt – even without the understanding of “between the two evenings.”

Numbers 33.3 And they departed from Rameses in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first
month; on the morrow (#04283) after the Passover the children of Israel went out with an high hand
in the sight of all the Egyptians.

The word means, <the morrow>, or, <the day after> in the sense of the daylight part of
the day.  We include it a second time for your convenience.

Online Bible:
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04283 mochorath {mokh-or-awth'} or mochoratham (1 Sam 30:17)
{mokh-or-aw-thawm'}

from the same as 04279; TWOT - 1185b; n f

AV - morrow 29, next day 2, next 1; 32

1) the morrow, the day after
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Here is the definition of morrow in English:

The American Heritage Dictionary – Third Edition:
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morrow (noun) 1. The following day; 2. The time immediately subsequent to a particular event. 3.
Archaic. The morning. from Old English morgen, morning.
**********************************************************

The English word, from which this word <morrow> was taken, anciently meant
<morning>.  When the KJV translators used the word, it probably meant <morning>.  
Perhaps someone can tell us how far back we would have to go for this meaning to be
archaic.  In any event, even today, it means, the following day - in the sense of the
daylight part of the day.  Our word <tomorrow> also comes from this same origin.  Old
English was <to morgenne> meaning “in the morning.”  When we say, we will go to town
tomorrow, we do not mean tomorrow night unless we attach the word <night> to the
phrase.  Rather we usually mean in the morning.  If we mean tomorrow afternoon, we will
use that distinction.  

There is no time that the use of this word in the KJV of the bible means anything besides
the daylight portion of the day.  Moreover, many times it specifically means the morning
part of the day – morning meaning from daylight to noon.

Numbers 33.3 says that the Israelites departed from Rameses on the <morrow> after the
Passover.  If the Israelites had observed the Passover at the beginning of the 14th of
Nisan/Abib the <morrow> after the Passover would have been the daylight portion of the
14th day, which followed.  

The problem is, that Numbers 33.3 tells us they departed from Rameses on the <15th
day> of the first month – Nisan/Abib.  Now, we know that the Passover was slain on the
14th day of Abib.  Therefore, the morrow after the Passover had to be the <daylight>
part of the 15th day.  You cannot depart on the 15th, if Passover is at the beginning of the
14th, and still leave on the <morrow> after the Passover.  The 15th would be two
morrows after an early 14th Passover!

This also proves that "between the two evenings" was the <afternoon> of the 14th.  This
is all that will fit and keep Numbers 33.3 in the picture.

The Passover as used in Numbers 33.3 is an event.  Passover was over by daylight of the
15th.  Moreover, the morrow after Passover began at daybreak of the 15th.  The
“morrow
after the Passover” is not a continuation of the Passover.  The event of
Passover was history at daybreak.

The Passover can be considered an event, a lamb, a festival, a sacrifice, an ordinance, or
a feast; but we have found no place where the Passover is considered a <day>.  It is
"kept" on a day, but it is not the day itself.  The Passover is an event that took place at
the end of the 14th and during the beginning of the 15th day of the month, until the time
of the Messiah.  Now the entire event takes place during the beginning of the 15th,
because Christ has fulfilled the sacrificial part of the 14th day.  However, the Israelites
did not and neither do we observe Passover from evening to evening.  There is a holy
convocation on the morrow after the Passover, so the 15th day is holy from evening to
evening.  However, the Passover Observance has always been only an evening service.  
Search the words “Passover day” in your bible software for the KJV and you will find,
“No such phrase.”  The KJV of the Bible never refers to the Passover as a <day>!  
Passover is an event, not a day.  
Numbers 33:3