THE MESSIAH’S DESIRE TO EAT THE
PASSOVER
Luke 22:15-16 (NKJV), "Then He said to them, 'With fervent desire I have desired to eat this (#5124)
Passover with you before I suffer; for (#1063) I say to you, I will no longer eat of it until it is fulfilled
in the kingdom of God.'"

Luke 22:15-16 (The Interlinear Bible), "And He said to them, With desire I desired to eat this (#5124)
Passover with you before My suffering.  For (#1063) I say to you that never in any way I will eat of it
until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God."      

Luke 22:15-16 (Ferrar Fenton), “And He said to them: “I have longingly desired to eat this Passover
with you before My suffering; however, I tell you that I shall not eat of it, until it can be administered
in the Kingdom of God.”

Because the translators of the KJV thought this Last Supper was the Passover Meal, they
have colored this passage toward that end.  Let us untangle this scripture beginning with
the word
this, which refers to the upcoming Passover Feast.  Later, Christ says, "...
remove
this (#5124) cup from me...(Luke 22:42)" in reference to His upcoming death on
the stake – a future event – not something going on when the statement was made.  The
Greek uses the very same word for
this (#5124) in both places.  The context must help us
determine if the word <this> refers to something in the past, present, or future.  As the
Passover Feast was yet future when He spoke (John 18:28), <this> is a future event.

Luke 22:42 Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this (#5124) cup from me: nevertheless not my
will, but thine, be done.

The important thing for us to understand is: What was the meaning for the word
<Passover> that Christ intended when He made this statement of desire to eat the
Passover.  He is unmistakably referring to the memorial of the Passover Meal of the
Exodus because He uses the term “<eat> this Passover”.

Many people have concluded that a Passover meal was on the table that evening, but one
cannot prove that theory.  We would deny the Messiah’s human feelings if we did not
allow that He would have rather eaten the upcoming Passover than to be hung on a tree!  
Would it have been wrong for Him to prefer to eat the Passover that year rather than die
on a tree?  Undoubtedly the agony in the garden just a little while later shows that the
Messiah yearned for another way for the Father to accomplish His will.  He was, of
course, willing to go through the ordeal, but he would have been a sadist to look forward
to it!  

The scriptures indicate that He preferred to eat the upcoming Passover, but realized that
He would be unable to do so.  Nevertheless, even with this behind Him, He still asked the
Father to remove "this cup" if it were possible.  He did not see a way out of the ordeal,
but He did not pass up the opportunity to make it known that He desired another way if it
were possible.  Notice also that the statement is, “With desire, I have desired”.  This
phrase indicates that He had been struggling with this desire before that evening.

It seems that there was still a small reservation about whether it would be permissible for
Him to eat the Passover that year, for in Luke 22:16, the subjunctive mood (#5632) is
used even for this verb
eating.  Therefore, this statement should probably be, "For I say
to you, I <may> never eat thereof again, until it be fulfilled in the Kingdom of God."  The
Messiah may have used this approach to keep the weight of death from Him until just
before His captivity – the point of no return.  He could have also had His disciples in mind
– sparing them from any apprehension over His coming death.

Luke 22:16 For I say unto you, [I will <5315> <0> not <3765> any more <3364> eat <5315>
(5632) thereof <846> <1537>], until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God.

The fact that the Messiah later entreated the Father to make another way indicates that
He had not fully prepared to accept death until after His last prayer in the garden.  

Mark 14:36 And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup from me:
nevertheless not what I will, but what thou wilt.

Luke 22:42 Saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but
thine, be done.

This is not to indicate that Christ was in anyway rebellious.  Rather, that the closer that
death came to Him and the more real it became, He did not finally and fully accept the
reality of it until after His last prayer in the garden.  After that prayer, we see a very
different Person in that now He was fully resolved to go forth and accomplish the task
before Him.  We never see Him hesitate from that moment.  Christ’s prayer in the garden
expresses the human side of His earthy experiment – the son of man.  God sent an angel
and strengthened Him and He resolutely went forth from the garden to finish His mission
– expressing the Son of God.  

He knew even before, that the mission had to be accomplished; but as all things were
possible with the Father, He allowed the Father to make that decision and did not
<finally> commit to it until that last prayer in the garden.  He now completely understood
the Father’s will on the matter and proceeded to accomplish it.
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